This new website lets you check the status of restaurants raided by Punjab Food Authority

By Maryam Dodhy on
August 10, 2015
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Over the past few months, Punjab Food Authority (PFA) has become Lahore’s beloved hero. The team headed by the fierce Ayesha Mumtaz has raided several eateries in the city in order to check their hygiene conditions; needless to say, they were far from impressive. Thanks to the power of social media, the images taken from these restaurants have been floating around on everyone’s news feed – further disgracing these restaurants and eateries.

No one was spared – these unannounced raids were made at even the top-notch restaurants and much to everyone’s surprise, many of them had terrible kitchen conditions with no attention on personal hygiene. Several have been fined, only a handful have been spared and a significant amount has been shut down till they improve their hygiene standards.

PFA Status

In the midst of this campaign, Asad Naeem, a web developer from Lahore, has taken this opportunity to launch a website called PFA Status. The website in not officially associated with the PFA, but serves a good purpose. The site is basically a visual representation on a Google Map of all the eateries that have been raided by the PFA. It also mentions their status – whether they have been sealed, cleared or fined. The site also has a complete list of all the restaurants in Lahore and also has their proper profile. The profile includes location details, date of the raid from PFA, status and the remarks given by the PFA.

The developer will add those eateries too, which were raided but didn’t get fine or seal notice because of clean kitchenettes. The site does not have a very visually appealing UI, but it doesn’t need to. It is serving its purpose just fine. So, before you head out for dining, visit PFA Status for a quick check.

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