Snapdragon 845 could make Galaxy S9 insanely fast

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February 12, 2018
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The Galaxy S9 could be the first phone to feature Snapdragon 845 chipset.

Qualcomm unveiled its latest SoC Snapdragon 845 back in December last year. The Snapdragon 845 is a successor to last year’s worthy contestant Snapdragon 835 and is expected to boost performance improvements, better power efficiency, and improved image processing in upcoming flagships of 2018. Now the new report from Cnet hints that the Galaxy S9 is going to be 25 percent faster than its predecessor, according to early benchmark tests of Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon 845 SoC.

Snapdragon 845 chipsets are expected to be featured in all major flagships of Android manufacturers this year, where Xiaomi’s CEO has already confirmed that Xiaomi Mi 7 will feature Snapdragon 845 chipset. However, the launch date of that device remains a confusion yet, wheres Samsung is confirmed to be unveiling its Galaxy S9 variants on Feb 25.

The reporters from Cnet spent two hours running and rerunning a suite of 12 benchmarking tests on Android reference phones that Qualcomm made out specifically to evaluate and fine-tune Snapdragon 845. The reference phones with specifications like 2.8GHz Snapdragon 845 processor, 6GB RAM and 5.5-inch LCD screen with 2,560×1,440-pixel resolution were compared with last year’s top models including the Galaxy Note 8, Pixel 2 XL and LG V30, which ran on Snapdragon 835 chipsets.

The benchmark results affirmed that Snapdragon 845 phone to be about 25 percent faster than 2017’s models. Qualcomm has also maximized the support of wide-gamut OLED displays. The chipsets are also said to be artificially intelligent, as we have seen from competitors like Apple and Huawei in recent months.

On the other hand, there were rumors that Galaxy S9 variants will feature Samsung’s own SoC Exynos 9810, but after this report, those rumors appear to fade away, and we are pretty much sure that the flagships will be falling in Qualcomm’s lap.

 
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